The Role of Knowledge

knowledge

For a few years now, the term *knowledge* has been getting a bad rap from across the spectrum. From a Learning Design perspective, we say: “In real life, no one will ask you to list the steps to perform first aid, what actually matters is that you’re able to administer first aid when the need arises.”

And even in general, we tend to discourage people from memorizing things. The thinking goes “Why do you need to know something that you can google and find out in a minute?”.

And so, while designing learning solutions, we focus all our energies on the application of knowledge, by designing plenty of practice activities.

This is not a bad thing at all. In fact, it’s very good.

But a lot of times, we fail to understand that knowledge, for knowledge’s sake, has a role to play as well.

There was a reason we learnt math tables by heart. These provide the foundational knowledge required for us to not have to rely on a calculator to perform simple math calculations.

Same is the case with alphabets and the fundamental vocabulary. Without it, we’d be unable to form sentences, unable to communicate our thoughts, and unable to express our feelings.

While these are rudimentary abilities meant for children, let’s look ahead to the kind of skill that we typically try to build for adults – for example, first aid.

Unless the first-aider knows the steps by heart, they wouldn’t be able to automatically administer first aid when the need arises. A good first-aider is one who has internalized the knowledge of the steps so well that they can perform without having to think about the steps.

In other words, their skill is built upon knowledge. And knowledge forms the key building block, or the foundation, on which application rests.

Therefore, while we focus on application and practice, let’s not forget what lies at the root of it all – knowledge.